Fraternal Order of Eagles
Big Walnut F.O.E. #3261
1623 Brice Road
Reynoldsburg, Ohio 43068
(614) 861-9073
Click Here to print a full-color version of the August 2019 Calendar.
Click Here to print a full-color version of the July 2019 Calendar.

Calendar

NOTE: Have information for this web site or event to add to the calendar? Send all info to Trustee Steve Anderson at: SteveAnderson@foe3261.com

Check back here for updates to the calendar throughout the month.
Boy Scout Troop #279
Boy Scout Troop #279 meets at the Big Walnut F.O.E. each week. We are proud to help our local scout troop with a place to meet!

  • Troop Meetings every Monday night 7-8:30 pm
  • Crew Meetings 1st & 3rd Sunday of each month 7-8 pm

Click Here to print the Committee Meetings Schedule
Click Here to print the Patrol Leaders Council (PLC) Meetings Schedule
Click Here to print the Camp Out Schedule

Back-to-school is big business

It's an annual tradition for many: lugging the kids around for clothing and other supplies at back-to-school time. But it's also big business, with this time of year ranking only behind the holidays for spending.

In a survey conducted last year by the National Retail Federation and Prosper Insights and Analytics, total spending for K-12 and college combined was projected to reach $82.8 billion.

A story out of Denver reported that back-to-school spending had surpassed Christmas shopping for a number of retailers there. Families with children in elementary through high school planned to spend an average $684.79 each, while college students and families of those in college planned to spend an average $942.17 each.

In an era dominated by tech, it was an old standby that nevertheless ruled the day. Families spent the most on clothing. NRF posited that gadgets have become such a staple in everyday life that they are purchased year-round now rather than being an item that consumers save for and buy at a certain time of year. Consumers also start fairly early, at an average of three weeks before school begins.

This can make for a lengthy retail season, as the start of the school year varies by about a month across the country (anywhere from the beginning of August to the beginning of September).
Cyberflashing on planes and trains

iPhone users on airplanes and even trains are increasingly assaulted by images that are 'air dropped' from nearby passengers, according to USA TODAY. Air Drop is an Apple phone feature that allows others to wirelessly send photos to other iPhones. Ideally this is a great idea for friends and family. Unfortunately, if the iPhone is set improperly it can also be used by evil strangers. The key is restricting the iPhone Air Drop settings to contacts or selecting 'receiving off.'
Click Here to print a copy of this puzzle.
Phishing attacks get more sophisticated

Click a link. Download a file. And that's where the trouble begins.

Phishing attacks by email or social media attempt to lure you into revealing a password or downloading malicious software. And these attacks are getting ever-more sophisticated.

"Scammers have diversified far beyond poorly spelled, purely text-based phishing email these days, building entire fake websites and Facebook pages as lures for campaigns. But even the humble phish email has evolved," according to David Harley of WeLiveSecurity.com.

Some classic ways to detect phishing emails are getting more difficult as scammers get more sophisticated.
- Misspelled words. Sometimes done intentionally to get past filters.
- Links to scam sites. Links can seem real. If they contain bitly or tinyurl they should be treated as suspicious.
- DropBox and Google Drive documents holding malicious code.
- Attachments can appear to be materials you are genuinely expecting from people who should be sending the materials.

Some good rules:
- Hover over the links to see if the domain is genuine.
- Attachments should set off alarm bells. Search for the company and compare domains. Mayflowernursing.com is not the same as Mayflowernursinghome.com.

Names can be spoofed. A sophisticated phishing email might use a name that exists in your database -- or the name of someone you know. If the name seems correct, compare other information in an email to data on the company Website. An incorrect phone number is a tipoff.

If you think you are good at catching phishing attempts, test your skills at: phishingquiz.withgoogle.com.